Friday, February 29, 2008

Russian Imperial Faberge Eggs

"QUANTUM SHOT" #380
link



Nestled Wonders (with an Easter Egg Surprise)

Peter Carl Faberge and his workshop made incredibly intricate Easter eggs for the Russian Imperial Court between 1885 and 1917.

These rare and unique creations had the cover of enameled gold and gem stones, which would open to reveal hidden wonders - sometimes golden yolk, sometimes a delicately sculpted figure, all nestled in many levels like a traditional Russian matryoshka doll. As only fitting for Easter Eggs, each one contained a surprise! (could it be that software's easter egg surprises have their origin at the Russian court?)




Here is a list of every known Faberge egg in existence (only 61 have survived), each design uniquely different (see some of them also here). The advent of Bolshevik's Revolution has put a stop to the Russian Empire's production of jeweled eggs... among other things.












Some eggs had an exquisite clock built-in, some were accompanied by even more delicate gold & gemstones figures, like royal carriage models or bouquet of jewelled flowers. Most had a mechanism of some kind, so it's even more fascinating to see them in action - a true wonder of miniaturization.






"There were eggs to commemorate the coronation of Czar Nicholas II, the completion of the Trans Siberian Railway, and anniversaries. There were eggs depicting the Imperial yacht-Standart, the Uspensky Cathedral, the Gatchina Palace, and during the time of war, the Red Cross and the military."








To get a feel for the prices commanded by prime Faberge examples, this particular egg is known to have been auctioned at $18 million dollars. It is an unrecorded egg, which makes it even more astonishing. (more info) -






(image credit: Robert Catalano)

Note the level of miniaturization in this example: Gatchina Palace Egg, 1901:


(image credit: Mary Harrsch)


The Regis Galerie inside the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas boasts a few Faberge Eggs on display:


(image credit: tsaiware)

Also see this fine flickr set for additional egg pictures.
Some jewelry that accompanied the eggs was also worth mentioning:



Even today the style and workmanship of Russian Imperial Court jewelers continue to inspire artists and architects: see for example The Grand Lisboa structure in Macau, China -


(image credit: James A)

Sources: The Faberge Experience, Russian Gifts

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Category: Art,Vintage
Related Posts:
Exquisite Eggshell Carving
Fantastic Gemstones

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Russian Imperial Faberge Eggs

"QUANTUM SHOT" #380
link



Nestled Wonders (with an Easter Egg Surprise)

Peter Carl Faberge and his workshop made incredibly intricate Easter eggs for the Russian Imperial Court between 1885 and 1917.

These rare and unique creations had the cover of enameled gold and gem stones, which would open to reveal hidden wonders - sometimes golden yolk, sometimes a delicately sculpted figure, all nestled in many levels like a traditional Russian matryoshka doll. As only fitting for Easter Eggs, each one contained a surprise! (could it be that software's easter egg surprises have their origin at the Russian court?)




Here is a list of every known Faberge egg in existence (only 61 have survived), each design uniquely different (see some of them also here). The advent of Bolshevik's Revolution has put a stop to the Russian Empire's production of jeweled eggs... among other things.












Some eggs had an exquisite clock built-in, some were accompanied by even more delicate gold & gemstones figures, like royal carriage models or bouquet of jewelled flowers. Most had a mechanism of some kind, so it's even more fascinating to see them in action - a true wonder of miniaturization.






"There were eggs to commemorate the coronation of Czar Nicholas II, the completion of the Trans Siberian Railway, and anniversaries. There were eggs depicting the Imperial yacht-Standart, the Uspensky Cathedral, the Gatchina Palace, and during the time of war, the Red Cross and the military."








To get a feel for the prices commanded by prime Faberge examples, this particular egg is known to have been auctioned at $18 million dollars. It is an unrecorded egg, which makes it even more astonishing. (more info) -






(image credit: Robert Catalano)

Note the level of miniaturization in this example: Gatchina Palace Egg, 1901:


(image credit: Mary Harrsch)


The Regis Galerie inside the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas boasts a few Faberge Eggs on display:


(image credit: tsaiware)

Also see this fine flickr set for additional egg pictures.
Some jewelry that accompanied the eggs was also worth mentioning:



Even today the style and workmanship of Russian Imperial Court jewelers continue to inspire artists and architects: see for example The Grand Lisboa structure in Macau, China -


(image credit: James A)

Sources: The Faberge Experience, Russian Gifts

Permanent Link......+StumbleUpon ...+Facebook
Category: Art,Vintage
Related Posts:
Exquisite Eggshell Carving
Fantastic Gemstones

Dark Roasted Blend's Photography Gear Picks:

Thursday, February 28, 2008

The Strangest Car Chase


Link
Scroll down for today's pictures & links.

The Strangest Car Chase

It has infinite mileage, and it has these anti-crash bumpers... but you still need to fasten your seatbelt -



url

Today's pictures & links:
Click to enlarge images.

Arabian Stunts


(original unknown)

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Wet bench? No problem!

Just rotate it a bit to the dry spot:




(design: Sungwoo Park, Yoonha Paick, Jongdeuk Son, Banseok Yoon, Eunbi Cho & Minjung Sim)

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Cool Shot of the Day
(in cooperation with National Geographic magazine)

Underwater Punk Movement


(image credit: National Geographic)

Photo by Chris Van Wyk -
This is an endangered Mary River turtle, endemic to Australia's Mary River. This species' nesting ground will be destroyed once a dam is constructed. The turtles are aided in their hunting behavior by cloacal sacs through which they can take oxygen from the water, allowing them to remain submerged far longer than other turtles. This physiological adaptation however only works in shallow, oxygen rich waters, not in dams.

I'd like to have a piece of your cream pie:


(image credit: National Geographic)

Photo by Bonnie Marsh -
We had just finished a dessert of coconut cream pie at the Coffee Shack on the north shore of the big island, Hawaii, when this little fellow scampered down the wall and onto our table to taste the remains.

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Mixed fresh links for today:

Sea Monster could swallow a small car - [fascinating]
All the water in the world, World Happiness - [visualizations]
Steampunk Borg Animals - [sculpture]
Curious Moments in Vintage Photography - [vintage]
Korea's day at the beach - [pictures]
Deja Vu, and 9 other similar experiences - [weird]
First color film ever realeased - [video anim]
Bored Astronauts: Inside Mir Space Station - [fun video]
Shake! Shake! unreal dance moves - [fun video]

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Our World Without Beatles

Think about it...



Relax, here is the whole photo session: link

But what would the world be without David Bowie's career? -



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Another Hard Drive Calamity

Hard on the heels of this link with disintegrated hard drive, here is another - looks like this hard drive got unlucky in the local mobster shoot-out:


(image credit: Erik Chipchase)

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Here is your dream house, 1957 edition

How times have changed...


(image credit: Plan59)

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In case you did not know:
- via


(image credit: Book of Knowledge)

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Godzilla vs. What?

update: Godzilla and Mothra vs. King Gidorah!





Another fallen giant:
- via



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Everyone needs a pet


(photo by AP/Tim Kimzey)

Barney Barnwell with his opossum "George". Barney is quite a character: Here he shares "How to make Moonshine" and here is the site of his bluegrass "The Plum Hollow Band".

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